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This is the summer of the vaccinated travel has in the US, and it's wreaking havoc on some of the nation's airlines and airports. Here are some ways for our Globe Aware volunteers to avoid stress that comes with   I volunteer at a major airport and deal with hundreds of unprepared travelers. Here are 12 ways to avoid lines and have a stress-free summer travel experience Thomas PalliniJul 1, 2021 Americans have been taking to the skies this summer more than any season since the start of the pandemic. Airlines and airports are still adjusting to increased passenger levels, causing long lines and delays. These travel tips will help flyers avoid lines and move through the airport easier. The summer of vaccinated travel has arrived in the US, and it's wreaking havoc on some of the nation's airlines and airports. AAA estimates that 47.7 million Americans will travel over Fourth of July weekend and air travel will likely see a large share of that number. Every day since June 22 has seen more than 1.8 million travelers depart from US airports and four days in that period have seen more than two million. Long lines will be the norm as travelers descend upon airports and airlines are still struggling to adjust to increased passenger volume following months of slowdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The onus, this summer, will be on travelers to help themselves instead of relying on the airlines to get them to where they need to…
If a Globe Aware volunteer tests positive for COVID-19 or learn that they were exposed to the virus while traveling, it’s important to be responsible, doing everything possible to avoid spreading it. Follow these tips to help spare other people the same fate and limit your added expenses!   What to Do If You Get COVID-19 While Traveling: 8 Tips to Get Back on Track Getting sick while traveling doesn’t have to be a disaster. Alicia A. WallaceHealthline It’s been over a year since the COVID-19 pandemic forced major changes to most of our lives. Countries all over the world continue to have a hard time responding to the spread of the virus and the resulting crises. Since the vaccine became available, more countries have opened their borders. People who have been itching to travel can finally hit the road. There’s still some risk in traveling during the pandemic, but it feels a bit safer. Some people want to escape the homes they’ve been cooped up in. Others desperately want to see their family members. And others need to take a mental health break, go to a place with different weather, move for a new job, or get access to a service that’s not available in their home countries. Whatever the reason, people are traveling, and the tourism industry is making room. What to expect if you test positive Vaccinated people have a sense of security because of the protection provided by antibodies. But it’s still possible to contract COVID-19,…
Thursday, 15 July 2021 10:19

Volunteer While Traveling With Your Kids

Volunteer alum Jodi Lipson speaks of her Globe Aware experiences with her family, and find out how you can book your meaningful volunteer vacation.   How to Volunteer While Traveling With Your Kids Looking for meaningful travel? Volunteering lets you give back and grow as a family. BY KEN BUDD JULY 15, 2021   When Jodi Lipson's daughter was seven, the duo embarked on a mommy-daughter adventure — and no, they didn't travel to Disneyland. For one week, the pair did maintenance work at a hostel in Peru and helped local schoolchildren learn English. They soon worked on three more projects with volunteer organization Globe Aware in Guatemala, Cambodia, and Costa Rica. The experiences, said Lipson, who works in book publishing in D.C., have expanded the worldview of her now 13-year-old daughter. "We've met so many people," she said. "We have a whole repertoire of experiences, feelings, and memories." As travel-hungry Americans start dusting off their passports, meaningful travel will top many bucket lists—and short-term volunteering should be on your radar. Volunteering abroad was ranked number three on a list of most-desired post-pandemic travel opportunities in a recent survey by Go Overseas, a resource site on meaningful travel. For kids, volunteering can reveal a world beyond their screens and fuel a lifelong interest in giving. It also helps families to escape their comfort zone, bond, and immerse themselves in local cultures. Volunteering might even impact your child's future. A teenage volunteer with Earthwatch, a scientific organization that runs expeditions worldwide, wrote her college essay on her volunteer experience and was admitted to…
The king of Bhutan has taken it upon himself to hike across the country to help curb the Covid-19 pandemic because "his Majesty's presence is far more powerful than just issuing public guidelines." Globe Aware applauds the king's continuing dedication and efforts to help his people.   Bhutan's king has been hiking and camping across his mountainous kingdom to oversee pandemic measures Matthew LohJune 28, 2021 Bhutan's king has been making personal trips across the country to visit remote regions and meet Covid-19 taskforces. His Facebook page shows him donning a baseball cap, hiking attire, and a backpack on his treks. Bhutan is one of the world's most mountainous countries, with an average elevation of 8,000 feet. The king of Bhutan has taken it upon himself to hike across mountains, visit remote villages, and trudge through leech-infested jungles to help his country curb the Covid-19 pandemic. King Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck has been making trips by car, horse, and foot across his kingdom to supervise pandemic measures and warn his people of the coronavirus, according to the official royal Facebook page. He's been making the trips over the last 14 months and has managed to span Bhutan's eastern border - which is more than 400 miles long - reported Reuters. One of his latest treks lasted five days across 41 miles, according to the royal Facebook page, in which he sported an outdoor backpack, hiking gear, and sometimes a pair of sunglasses or a dark baseball cap. Camping on the…
Stress, jet lag, cramped airplane seats, new foods and exhaustion all conspire to test your physical limits. Globe Aware volunteers can avoid these travel symptoms by following these helpful tips!   How to deal with vacation constipation, swelling and other travel symptoms A. PawlowskiJuly 2, 2021TODAY Travel can do wonders for the soul. It can also do a number on your body. The very word originates from “travail,” or “painful or laborious effort,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary. Painful, indeed, as stress, jet lag, cramped airplane seats, new foods and exhaustion all conspire to test your physical limits. Almost 48 million Americans are expected to travel during the 2021 Fourth of July holiday period — from Thursday through Monday — the second most traveled Independence Day holiday weekend since AAA began tracking the numbers. This represents a near return to pre-pandemic levels and an increase of almost 40% compared to 2020, the organization said. Here are common symptoms you may experience while traveling this summer and tips to stay healthy during your journey: 1. Vacation constipation You may notice your bathroom habits change quite a bit once you hit the road. When a regular routine suddenly becomes anything but, it can cause discomfort and concern. “Many people experience constipation when they travel,” said NBC News medical contributor Dr. Natalie Azar. There are several possible reasons why. Eating habits: You may be eating less fiber and drinking less water, all of which contributes to travel constipation, Azar noted. Try to…
The new CDC travel guidelines now include specific recommendations for both vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. Globe Aware volunteers should continue to check their destination's page to stay updated on travel restrictions. CDC Travel Guidelines Relax for More than 100 Countries France, Japan, and Mexico are among the destinations with revised guidelines. BY SHANNON MCMAHONJune 9, 2021On Monday the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revised its coronavirus travel guidelines for over 100 countries “to better differentiate countries with severe outbreak situations from countries with sustained, but controlled, COVID-19 spread,” the agency said on its website. The new CDC travel guidelines now include specific recommendations for both vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers. The 110 changes includes 61 places that have been downgraded from the highest Level 4 status to a Level 3, plus 50 more lowered to Levels 1 and 2, reports Reuters. The U.S. State Department has mirrored the CDC changes by lowering 85 of its own travel advisories for countries including Japan ahead of the Olympics, but told Reuters it did not lower all 110 advisories after taking into consideration "commercial flight availability, restrictions on U.S. citizen entry, and impediments to obtaining COVID test results within three calendar days." (Returning to the United States still requires a COVID-19 test taken no more than 72 hours in advance.) Countries downgraded to a Level 1, for “low” COVID-19 risk, include Singapore, Israel, South Korea, Iceland, and Belize. Level 2 “moderate-risk” countries include Barbados, Bermuda, Cambodia, Mauritius, Uganda, and Zambia. Countries…
Over the years, this couple has visited everywhere from Rome and Iceland, recreating scenes from famous films! Have our Globe Aware volunteers ever done this before on a volunteer vacation!? The couple who travel the world recreating movie scenes Tamara Hardingham-GillCNNJune 25, 2021 (CNN) — After going on several big trips together as a couple, Robin Lachhein and Judith Schneider, both from Frankfurt, Germany, wanted to do something extra special for their next vacation. They talked through various potential ideas before coming up with something that excited both of them -- traveling to a movie location and recreating a famous scene. In 2014, they visited Prague and re-enacted a clip from the 1996 film "Mission: Impossible," making sure to document the moment on camera. Over the next few years, Lachhein and Schneider visited everywhere from Rome and Iceland, to New York and even Utah, recreating scenes or promotional shots from films like "Thelma and Louise," "The Hunger Games," "Eat Pray Love," "The Devil Wears Prada" as well as TV series such as "Game of Thrones" and "Downton Abbey." In 2018, the pair launched an Instagram account, Secret Famous Places, where they share their re-enactments alongside stills from the movies that inspired their shoots. The account now has nearly 40,000 followers, with the likes of Oscar winners Hilary Swank and Marion Cotillard among those posting in the comments section. Lachhein, 32 and Schneider, 31, who met at a friend's birthday party 11 years ago, say they're thrilled that their slightly unusual…
Positive news to share with our Globe Aware volunteers and coordinators! The U.S. announced it will send 55 million Covid-19 vaccine doses to countries in Latin America, Asia and Africa, in order to "defeat COVID-19 and to achieve global health security.” U.S. to split 55 million Covid vaccine doses between Latin America, Asia and Africa JUN 21 2021 Berkeley Lovelace Jr. The Biden administration announced Monday it will send 55 million Covid-19 vaccine doses to countries in Latin America, Asia and Africa as the coronavirus continues to rapidly spread in low- and middle-income nations. The 55 million vaccine doses are the remaining portion of 80 million shots President Joe Biden has committed to donating abroad. Earlier this month, the administration said it would send the first 25 million doses to South and Central America, Asia, Africa, neighboring countries and U.S. allies. The U.S. plans to allocate 75% of its initial 80 million doses through COVAX, the nonprofit that distributes vaccines mostly to poor countries, while the remaining shots will be sent to countries currently dealing with surges in new infections, the administration said Monday. The administration said about 14 million doses will go to places in Latin America and the Caribbean, including Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Paraguay, Bolivia, Uruguay, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Panama and Costa Rica. About 16 million will go to countries in Asia like India, Nepal, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Philippines, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Laos and Thailand, the administration said. About 10 million doses will…
Hoi An is much loved for its peaceful atmosphere, centuries-old houses, and unique cuisine. Consider a Globe Aware volunteer vacation in Vietnam for summer 2022! Hoi An among 10 cheapest global tourist destinations By Nguyen Quy June 21, 2021 Hoi An Town in central Vietnam is eighth on this year’s annual list of 10 cheapest tourist destinations in the world. The ancient town in Quang Nam Province and Bali in Indonesia are the only two Southeast Asian destinations to break into the top 10, with the latter standing in fourth position, according to the annual Holiday Money report released by the Post Office, the U.K.’s leading currency exchange agency. The ranking is based on the minimum required budget for eight staple items that holidaymakers are likely to purchase – a cup of coffee, a pint of beer, a can/bottle of Coca-Cola, a bottle of water, sun cream, insect repellent, and a three-course dinner for two with a bottle of wine at 46 tourist destinations worldwide. According to the report, the average cost in Hoi An is £58.39 ($80.51) per day, which is more expensive than the famous resort island of Bali at £55.01 ($75.89). In Hoi An, a can/bottle of beer at a resort would cost around £2.85 ($3.93), and a cup of coffee, £0.71 ($0.97), the report said. A romantic dinner for two - a three-course evening meal, including a bottle of house wine, would cost tourists around £34.37 ($75.9) while a glass of wine would cost £2.6 ($3.58).…
Thursday, 17 June 2021 16:48

Here's A Guide if You are Flying Overseas

Face shields required in airports at Peru, 21-day quarantines in some countries...with international air travel surging in the summer our Globe Aware volunteers will run into quite a range of travel restrictions and entry requirements. Flying Overseas? There's A LOT You Need To Know. Here's A Guide June 11, 2021FRAN KRITZ and DAVID SCHAPER Each week, we answer frequently asked questions about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions." See an archive of our FAQs here. I live in the U.S. and am considering a trip to another country. What do I need to know about international air travel at this stage of pandemic? First of all, you have plenty of company. International air travel is expected to surge this summer. Americans are thinking of European vacations again. "We've had people asking a lot about Europe," says Chicago-area travel adviser Kendra Thornton of Royal Travel & Tours. "Not necessarily booking but wanting to keep tabs on it." In addition, residents of the U.S. with family members in other countries are eager for a reunion after pandemic-enforced separations. People may be traveling abroad for work as well. They'll run into quite a range of travel restrictions and entry requirements. NPR correspondent Jason Beaubien was surprised to see his face on a giant screen in an airport in Sierra Leone, where thermal scanners take the temperature of everyone in the…
Wednesday, 16 June 2021 10:38

Puerto Rico Eases Covid Entry Protocols

Traveling to Puerto Rico is now even easier with updated entry requirements. Fully vaccinated Globe Aware volunteers arriving from the U.S. can visit without a negative COVID-19 test and don't need to wear masks at beaches and parks.   Puerto Rico Eases Entry Protocols JUNE 07, 2021 Puerto Rico further eased COVID-19 protocols, allowing for more access to public facilities and increased capacities at commercial businesses effective June 7. The updated measures were announced in a June 3 executive order. Under the changes, Puerto Rico bars and game rooms may now reopen at 50 percent capacity. Outdoor bars and "chinchorros" are not subject to capacity limits, but patrons not from the same family unit must maintain a physical distance of six feet from one another. In addition, a 75 percent capacity threshold is now authorized for restaurants, malls, casinos, theaters, museums and hotel pool facilities. Social activities, including corporate and business events, may also proceed at 75 percent capacity. Attendees are required to provide proof of a negative PCR antigen test result or proof of full vaccination. Puerto Rico’s Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport is providing Johnson and Johnson vaccination in Terminal B. Vaccination is also being offered on the Puerto Rican islands of Vieques and Culebra via the Maritime Transportation Authority ferry terminal in Ceiba. The revised measures follow the government’s recent move to eliminate negative COVID-19 PCR test requirements for fully vaccinated travelers arriving on domestic flights and the lifting of the local curfew.
Globe Aware volunteers could see some major changes in the not-so-distant future when it comes to air travel. This could include multi-level cabins and stand-up seats.  Double-Decker Airplane Cabins Might Be the Future of Air Travel Air travel could see some major changes in the not-so-distant future, including multi-level cabins. By Caitlyn Hitt6/3/2021 Air travel has evolved a lot since the days of Lewis and Clark, but one thing remains constant: Uncomfortably cramped quarters. However, plane designers have been hard at work trying to change this without having to cut the number of passengers a plane can fit (aka profit for airlines). Plane designers have toyed with several different seating concepts, including stand-up seats, but it’s multi-level airplane cabins that are really catching on lately: Zephyr introduced such double-decker lie-flat seats last year, which quickly went viral. At this year’s Crystal Cabin Awards, which judges aircraft interior innovation, a similar dual-level cabin was introduced, called the Chaise Longue Economy Seat Project. It was designed by 21-year-old Alejandro Nuñez Vicente, a Spanish native who’s studying at TU Delft University in the Netherlands. His concept differed from other multi-level cabin ideas in that it suggested alternating each row of seats between on-floor seating and elevated seating, getting rid of overhead bins to make more space, instead storing carry-ons under seats. He told CNN Travel that he believed doing so would increase leg room. “The lower row has the advantage of passengers having the lounge experience of a couch by stretching the legs,…
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